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Theddlethorpe All Saints Church

Theddlethorpe All Saints Church

Theddlethorpe All Saints Church

All Saints History

Theddlethorpe All Saints church was built in the 14th century and has evidence of Norman origins; sometimes known as the Cathedral of the Marsh, due to its size and spaciousness.

The church was constructed around 1380, and the exterior presents a rather strange appearance, with early red-brick mixed with local stone.

 

Theddlethorpe All Saints Church interior

Theddlethorpe All Saints Church interior

Church Interior

One of the most interesting interior features is a memorial brass in the south chapel which is usually covered with a carpet for protection. The brass has been dated to 1424, and shows an armoured knight, clad in a style of armour which was already obsolete when the brass was created.

 

Theddlethorpe All Saints Screen Detail

Theddlethorpe All Saints Screen Detail

Rood Screen

The screen separating chapels from the aisles is carved with some delightful grotesque faces and other images. The memorial stones at the end of the nave are also fascinating.

Also of interest are rows of narrow pews on the north wall of the nave; these were reserved for sick and poor of the parish. These pews are also 14th century.

There are detailed descriptions of the interior available in the church for visitors to refer to.

Theddlethorpe All Saints Screen Detail

Theddlethorpe All Saints Screen - John the Baptist's head on a platter

Fifteenth century reredos niche in All Saints side chapel

Fifteenth century reredos niche in Theddlethorpe All Saints side chapel

Theddlethorpe All Saints Pews

Theddlethorpe All Saints - pews for the sick and poor

Theddlethorpe All Saints Memorial Stone

Theddlethorpe All Saints - Memorial Stone

Theddlethorpe St Helen's Church

Theddlethorpe St Helen's

Theddlethorpe St Helen's Church

St Helen's History

Although Theddlethorpe St Helenís is lacking the grandeur of All Saints, this church is still used for regular services and has had some internal reordering to accommodate practical use. The building was almost entirely reconstructed in 1866 but retains some medieval facets including the arch to the tower.

St Helen's Reredos

Reredos niche in Theddlethorpe St Helen's side chapel during 2010 flower festival

Theddlethorpe Curiosities

Theddlethorpe Station - now converted to a house

Theddlethorpe Station - now converted to a house

The Railway

Theddlethorpe railway station was opened on 17 October 1877 by Louth and East Coast Railway, and closed on 5 December 1960 by British Railways (Eastern Region). The path of the disused railway, which was the Mablethorpe Loop Line, ran from Louth through Mablethorpe to Willoughby, and can still easily be traced in many places.

Ridge and Furrow Field on Brickyard Lane

Ridge and Furrow Field on Brickyard Lane Theddlethorpe

 

Ridge and Furrow

Ridge and furrow is the name given to the regular humps and troughs that can sometimes be found on ancient fields and is the result of ploughing over a long period of time. In Theddlethorpe, this technique was clearly used to aid drainage. An example of the ridge and furrow pattern can be seen on one of the fields bordering Brickyard Lane in Theddlethorpe.